Review: Angelfall- Susan Ee

Angelfall (Penryn & the End of Days, #1)

Angelfall

(Penryn & the End of Days #1)

Susan Ee

My rating:

4 star

Goodreads summary:

It’s been six weeks since angels of the apocalypse descended to demolish the modern world. Street gangs rule the day while fear and superstition rule the night. When warrior angels fly away with a helpless little girl, her seventeen-year-old sister Penryn will do anything to get her back.
Anything, including making a deal with an enemy angel.
Raffe is a warrior who lies broken and wingless on the street. After eons of fighting his own battles, he finds himself being rescued from a desperate situation by a half-starved teenage girl.
Traveling through a dark and twisted Northern California, they have only each other to rely on for survival. Together, they journey toward the angels’ stronghold in San Francisco where she’ll risk everything to rescue her sister and he’ll put himself at the mercy of his greatest enemies for the chance to be made whole again.
Recommended for ages 16 and up.

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This book was me taking a leap back into YA dystopians, which I have really enjoyed in the past, until I suddenly got fed up with it. Due to too much of the same thing happening in different books. It tends to make reading new books less exciting. But this book was going to be different! Though at first it was only average. It didn’t diverge all that much from the standard “something bad happened and now I will have to save my family”. But there was some new stuff in there, at least for me, and that definitely brightened up this novel. It’s not a hugely long book so it didn’t take very long to read.

I enjoyed the characters in this book and the relationship they had was very nice to bear witness to. It wasn’t the completely awestruck, instant romance stuff that can happen at times in YA books, so that was good. No extreme fawning over cute angel guys that will get the main character in so much trouble she’ll never get out. So that was a strong point for this book. It’s rally weird that in the synopsis the mother isn’t mentioned, because she does play a role in the story, though it’s a special role. Raffe was a real fun guy to read about, and he felt realistic in that way that he just didn’t give away all of his secrets at once, just because Penryn happened to blink at him in a certain attractive way. He knew how not to give away all of the information at the same time, which was great for diverting great informational floods.  On a side note: I really dislike the name Penryn.

Obviously angels play a role in this story (or did you miss that obvious hint in the title?) and while I haven’t read a lot of books centered around these creatures they didn’t feel extremely classic. Their actions are at times pretty unorthodox which made them for interesting “villains” in this story. I found their interactions with each other less ordinary than I imagined before I started reading this book. And the descriptions of their appearance were a lot different from the angels we see in more classic literature. This was a nice surprise, though I have to say I was not as pleased with all of their appearances. But it doesn’t matter all that much, so no big deal.

For a very big part of this book the story line was entertaining though nothing too special. It didn’t feel extremely refreshing for the most part. But then suddenly we get to the ending, like barely a couple of chapters before the ending, and BAM the story takes a sharp turn away from things that have been seen before. Into a whole darker theme that feels fresh. It’s great that this happens and it really did leave ma wanting to read more (good thing there will be a next book). It’s just a shame that it only happens so late in the book because this could have been a lot more intense and dark. Let’s hope the next book will start off with that darker mood right away instead of blustering into it by the end.

In general I think the strong points of this book were the characters and the darkening plot-twist towards the ending.

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